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Paperblanks Ancient Illumination-Spinola Hours,Ultra,Lined 176p

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Original price $35.95
Original price $35.95 - Original price $35.95
Original price $35.95
Current price $34.95
$34.95 - $34.95
Current price $34.95
SKU 9781439793916

SPINOLA HOURS

Ancient Illumination

Displaying astounding naturalistic illusionism, the Spinola Hours is one of the most visually sophisticated 16th-century Flemish manuscripts. It contains a calendar of Church holidays, hours, offices and masses, as well as prayers, hymns and readings, all richly illuminated as seen in the page reproduced here.

Product Information

FORMAT
Ultra
SIZE
Width: 180mm (7")
Height: 230mm (9")
Depth: 20mm (¾")
INTERIOR Lined
SPACE BETWEEN LINES 8.11mm
LINES PER PAGE 25
PAGE COUNT 176 Pages
CLOSURE Elastic Band
COLOUR Multi-colour
GSM (PAPER WEIGHT) 100
COVER Softcover
EDGE PRINTING
No
BINDING TYPE
Smyth Sewn
POUCH TYPE
Back Cover Pouch
INTERIOR PAPER
Smooth
RIBBON MARKERS
1
MORE FEATURES
  • Decorative printed cover paper
  • FSC-certified text paper
  • Threaded stitching and glue, as needed
  • Cloth headbands
  • Acid-free sustainable forest paper
  • Flexible cover and spine

About This Design

  • Original Art: Illuminated manuscript page from the Spinola Hours
  • Era: circa 1510–1520
  • Region: Belgium
With pages displaying astounding plays of naturalistic illusionism, the luxurious personal prayer book known as the Spinola Hours is one of the most visually sophisticated Flemish manuscripts of the 16th century.

A book of hours contains texts including a calendar of Church holidays, the Hours of the Virgin (a cycle of prayer services devoted to the Virgin Mary), the Office for the Dead, and other prayers, hymns and readings. This particular example augments these contents with a special series of weekday offices and masses, providing even more possibilities for rich illuminations. The book was undoubtedly commissioned for a wealthy patron, perhaps Margaret of Austria, for whom the Master of James IV of Scotland, a famed manuscript illuminator and painter, produced other works. In the 1700s it belonged to the Spinola family in Genoa, from whom it takes its modern name.

We are honoured to feature this unparalleled example of illumination from the J. Paul Getty Museum as part of our collaborative collection.